Beijing Tour
Beijing, the political, cultural and educational heart of China, has an unparalleled wealth of discovery to delight and intrigue travelers as they explore Beijing’s ancient past and enjoy its exciting modern development. Its charm lies in the perfect combination of ancient civilization and modern flavor. Now Beijing has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world.
Beijing Attractions
Some typical cuisine and restaurants
Nightlife and Bar Street
Tour itineraries
Beijing Subway Map
 
Beijing Attractions
The Temple of Heaven
The Temple of Heaven, founded in the first half of the 15th century, is a dignified complex of fine cult buildings set in gardens and surrounded by historic pine woods. In its overall layout and that of its individual buildings, it symbolizes the relationship between earth and heaven – the human world and God's world – which stands at the heart of Chinese cosmogony, and also the special role played by the emperors within that relationship.
Great Wall
In c. 220 B.C., under Qin Shi Huang, sections of earlier fortifications were joined together to form a united defence system against invasions from the north. Construction continued up to the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), when the Great Wall became the world's largest military structure. Its historic and strategic importance is matched only by its architectural significance.
The Summer Palace
The Summer Palace, first built in 1750, largely destroyed in the war of 1860 and restored on its original foundations in 1886 – is a masterpiece of Chinese landscape garden design. The natural landscape of hills and open water is combined with artificial features such as pavilions, halls, palaces, temples and bridges to form a harmonious ensemble of outstanding aesthetic value.
The Forbidden City
Seat of supreme power for over five centuries (1416-1911), the Forbidden City in Beijing, with its landscaped gardens and many buildings (whose nearly 10,000 rooms contain furniture and works of art), constitutes a priceless testimony to Chinese civilization during the Ming and Qing dynasties. The Imperial Palace of the Qing Dynasty in Shenyang consists of 114 buildings constructed between 1625–26 and 1783. It contains an important library and testifies to the foundation of the last dynasty that ruled China, before it expanded its power to the centre of the country and moved the capital to Beijing. This palace then became auxiliary to the Imperial Palace in Beijing. This remarkable architectural edifice offers important historical testimony to the history of the Qing Dynasty and to the cultural traditions of the Manchu and other tribes in the north of China.
Ming Tombs
The tombs of 13 Ming dynasty emperors and their consorts are scattered in a gorgeous valley 45 kilometers of Beijing. All but three of the Ming emperors were buried here. The site for the Ming Tombs was carefully chosen as the imperial cemetery by Fengshui masters after careful examination of the surrounding area on orders from the indefatigable emperor Yongle who also commissioned the Forbidden City and Temple of Heaven.
Peking Man Site at Zhoukoudian
Peking Man Site at Zhoukoudian is a Pleistocene hominid site on the North China Plain. As the site of significant hominid remains discovered in the Asian continent demonstrating an evolutionary cultural sequence, Zhoukoudian is of major importance within the worldwide context. It is not only an exceptional reminder of the prehistoric human societies of the Asian continent, but also illustrates the process of human evolution, and is of significant value in the research and reconstruction of early human history.
Lama Temple
Lama Temple The Lama Temple is decorated with delicate scrolls and massive icons. Its buildings are a hybrid of Tibetan, Mongolian and Han architectural style. The lama temple is a tranquil spot, except during the Spring Festival when it seems all of China’s Buddhists throng its altars to burn bushels of incense and pray for good fortune.
Hutong
Hutong is one of the unique special features in Beijing; in a degree, it could be simply defined as the old city alley that tend towards from east to west. There are thousands of Hutong here surrounded the Forbidden City, most of which were came into being in the dynasties Yuan, Ming, Qing. As the symbol of Beijing City, a hutong has its own layout and structure, which makes it a wonder in the world. When taking a bird's eye view of Beijing, you will find the combination of hutongs and courtyards just like an orderly chessboard with delicate gardens, fine rockeries, and ancient ruins. Hutongs have witnessed the development of Beijing. Where there is a hutong, there is a story.
The Confucius Temple
The Confucius Temple at Beijing is the second largest Confucian Temple in China, after the one in Confucius' hometown of Qufu. The temple was built in 1302. The compound was enlarged twice, during the Ming and Qing dynasties and now occupies some 20,000 square meters. All emperors of the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties came to the temple to pay homage to the ancient sage Confucius.
The White Cloud Taoist Temple
The White Cloud Taoist Temple is the largest and the only one of its kind open to the public. Taoism, a religion native to China, has a history of 1,800 years. The temple got its present name in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and was damaged twice by war and fire, and rebuilt and repaired several times. Today it is more or less the same as it was after renovation in 1706. It is the chief temple of the Quan Zhen Taoist Sect and one of the three big center temples for the Quan Zhen Taoist Sect.
Acupuncture and moxibustion of traditional Chinese medicine
Acupuncture and moxibustion are forms of traditional Chinese medicine widely practised in China and also found in regions of south-east Asia, Europe and the Americas. The theories of acupuncture and moxibustion hold that the human body acts as a small universe connected by channels, and that by physically stimulating these channels the practitioner can promote the human body’s self-regulating functions and bring health to the patient. This stimulation involves the burning of moxa (mugwort) or the insertion of needles into points on these channels, with the aim to restore the body’s balance and prevent and treat disease. In acupuncture, needles are selected according to the individual condition and used to puncture and stimulate the chosen points. Moxibustion is usually divided into direct and indirect moxibustion, in which either moxa cones are placed directly on points or moxa sticks are held and kept at some distance from the body surface to warm the chosen area. Moxa cones and sticks are made of dried mugwort leaves. Acupuncture and moxibustion are taught through verbal instruction and demonstration, transmitted through master-disciple relations or through members of a clan. Currently, acupuncture and moxibustion are also transmitted through formal academic education.
Peking Opera
Peking Opera is a performance art incorporating singing, reciting, acting, martial arts. Although widely practised throughout China, its performance centres on Beijing, Tianjin and Shanghai. Peking opera is sung and recited using primarily Beijing dialect, and its librettos are composed according to a strict set of rules that prize form and rhyme. They tell stories of history, politics, society and daily life and aspire to inform as they entertain. The music of Peking opera plays a key role in setting the pace of the show, creating a particular atmosphere, shaping the characters, and guiding the progress of the stories. ‘Civilian plays’ emphasize string and wind instruments such as the thin, high-pitched jinghu and the flute dizi, while ‘military plays’ feature percussion instruments like the bangu or daluo. Performance is characterized by a formulaic and symbolic style with actors and actresses following established choreography for movements of hands, eyes, torsos, and feet. Traditionally, stage settings and props are kept to a minimum. Costumes are flamboyant and the exaggerated facial make-up uses concise symbols, colours and patterns to portray characters’ personalities and social identities. Peking opera is transmitted largely through master-student training with trainees learning basic skills through oral instruction, observation and imitation. It is regarded as an expression of the aesthetic ideal of opera in traditional Chinese society and remains a widely recognized element of the country’s cultural heritage.
The art of seal engraving
It is a cornerstone of Chinese fine arts. The seal was originally used as a signature or sign of authority, but it came to be used by all social classes and in much of Asia. The Seal Engravers’ Society of Xiling in Zhejiang Province, central China, which was founded a century ago, preserves the art of seal engraving along with approximately a hundred other specialized institutions. The design is first sketched on paper, and then engraved on stone, in reverse, with a knife. In addition to mastery of traditional calligraphy, the art of engraving requires a high degree of virtuosity, since the artist works on a tiny surface area where every curve, every thickness of line counts. The very diverse motifs are the fruit of the artist’s imagination and culture. As an instrument of calligraphy and painting, the seal is a work of art in itself. It expresses an entire culture’s ideas about humankind and nature. Today, seals continue to be used in official documents and private correspondence. Even though those understanding the complex characters are ever fewer, the art of seal engraving is still practised by both professionals and amateurs.
Chinese calligraphy
It has always been more than simply a tool for communication, incorporating as it does the element of artistry for which the practice is still valued in an age of ballpoint pens and computers. Indeed, calligraphy is no longer the basic tool of intellectuals and officials but has become the preserve of professional artisans and amateur enthusiasts. Whether they are recording information or simply creating beautiful forms, calligraphers’ brushes are used to ink five different styles of script, known as ‘seal’, ‘official’, ‘cursive’, ‘running’ and ‘regular’. The art may appear on any writing surface – even the rocky walls of cliffs – but it is especially common on letters, scrolls, works of literature and fan coverings. Today, in addition to traditional master-apprentice instruction, calligraphy is also taught at school. Many ceremonies that mark national celebrations and religious rituals incorporate the practice and calligraphy has itself proved influential on modern art, architecture and design. In its distinctive Chinese form, calligraphy offers an important channel for the appreciation of traditional culture and for arts education. It is also a source of pride and pleasure for the Chinese people and embodies important aspects of the country’s intellectual and artistic heritage.
Chinese Paper Cut
Present throughout China and in various ethnic groups, paper-cut is a popular art integral to everyday lives. A predominantly female pursuit, it is transmitted from mother to daughter over a long period of time, beginning in childhood, and is particularly common in rural areas. It earns the most skilful artists respect and admiration. Many techniques are used: the paper can be cut or engraved with a chisel, coloured or left blank. Increasingly, modern technologies are used. Motifs, which vary greatly and are often devised by the artist, depend on the region of origin (for example, in southern China fine and delicate motifs predominate) and the purpose of the product, which might be used for interior decor (windows, beds and ceilings), festivities (weddings, birthdays and ceremonies), or prayers (invoking the rain, warding off the devil, and so on). As a key part of Chinese social life in all ethnic groups, paper-cut expresses the moral principles, philosophies and aesthetic ideals of its exponents. It continues to provide an outlet for emotion and is experiencing an unprecedented revival.
Beijing Typical Cuisine
As the cultural and political capital of China for centuries, Beijing has attracted China’s most talented chefs, who in turn have influenced the capital’s flavors with their regional flair. Beijing Cuisine is a cooking style in Beijing by integrating the cooking techniques of Han, Manchu, Mongolian and Hui ethnic groups, and absorbing main local dishes from all over the country. Beijing Cuisine has formed its own unique characteristics: dishes are soft, crisp, fresh and tender prepared in different ways of frying. Beijing cuisine is famous for its hundreds of dishes with special flavors that are unmatched by any other cuisine.
Beijing Roasted Duck
It is believed that is one of the most delicious dishes in Beijing. Most visitors coming to Beijing will never forget to try it. Beijing Roasted Duck is always served in well-cut slices. The chef cuts the meat into thin slices, each having a piece of skin and perfect with the complete layers of the meat. Then the meat is served with very thin pancakes, Chinese onions and special sauce -- usually sweet bean sauce. The way to eat it is to coat the thin pancake with sauce, slap on a few pieces of meat and roll up the pancake. Quanjude Restaurant With its long history, Quanjude roast duck enjoys a high reputation among domestic and overseas consumers for the peculiar roast technique and outstanding quality. It ranks the first not only in Chinese Famous Dishes, but also in Elite of Chinese Famous Dishes. In many cases, Quanjude lists the first among famous restaurants. Address: No.14 Qianmen West Street, Beijing Business hours: Daily 11 am – 2 pm, 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm Booking Tel: 010- 6701 1379, 6511 2418 Da Dong Roast Duck Restaurant The menu is very picturesque and huge with a large array of dishes for you to choose from. The food here not only tastes good but it looks good and you know the chefs have definately paid lots of attention to the plating and structure of their dishes. Address: 1-2/F, Nanxincang International Plaza, 22A Dongsishitiao, Dongcheng District Business hours: Daily 11 am – 10 pm Reservation Tel: 5169 0329
Hotpot
The hotpot is quite popular in Beijing, especially in cold winter. The hot pot used to be a brass pot with a wide outer rim around a chimney and a charcoal burner underneath. Nowadays electric pot is used. Water containing mushrooms and dried shrimps is boiled in a pot. Thin pieces of raw mutton are cooked with chopsticks in a self-service pot of boiling water. Diners dip thin slices of chopsticks in a self-service pot of boiling water. Diners dip thin slices of raw mutton into the water, where the meat cooks rapidly. The cooked slices are then dipped into a sauce. This cooking method ensures that the meat is both tender, and tasty. Cabbage, noodles and pea starch noodles and gradually added to the boiling water, which becomes a very rich broth drunk at the end of the meal. Donglaishun Restaurant Dong Lai Shun’s essence remains its famous mutton hot pot. Boiled, as ever, in distinctive copper pots over white-hot charcoal, Dong Lai Shun’s broth gets so deliciously thick towards the end that you don’t even need a dip to add extra flavor to the thin-sliced strips of meat. There’s plenty competition in the field these days, and no shortage of new-fangled approaches to cooking up meat and veg in a bubbling soup, but Dong Lai Shun is still the hot pot of choice for many Beijingers. Address: 5/F, APM Mall, No. 138 Wangfujing Street Business hours: 11 am – 10 pm Tel: 6528 0932 Haidilao Hotpot As famous for its hospitality as it is for its authentic Sichuan cuisine: get your nails done and enjoy a fruit plate while you wait in the long queue. Don’t forget to ask for the noodle show – an energetic waiter will pull noodles right at your table. Voted "Best Hot Pot," "Outstanding Service" and "Outstanding Chinese Restaurant of the Year" in the Beijinger’s 2011 Restaurant Awards. Address: 8/F Letian Yintai Department Store, No.88, Wangfujing Street Business hours: 24 hours Tel: 57620153, 51620741
Imperial Cuisine
Imperial Court Cuisine is a style of food with origins in the Imperial Palace. Based on foods served to the Emperor and his court, Imperial Court Cuisine is well-known by the original features of the raw material and carefully selected ingredients. Additionally, the dishes are decorated by different colorful vegetables and fruits carved into various shapes. Fangshan Restaurant The Fangshan Restaurant is located in Yilantang Hall on the north side of the Jade Isle in Beihai Park, where Empress Dowager Cixi (1835--1908) used to take her meals after sight-seeing in the park. The food made in the Qing Palace for the emperors was called imperial food, so a restaurant operating outside the palace making and selling imperial food was only an imitation. Beijing’s oldest imperial restaurant, located inside Behai Park, features the favorite nibbles of the Dowager Empress Cixi, waitresses dressed like Manchurian courtesans and an opulent setting befitting its historical surroundings. The 14-course "Emperor's Dinner" is their main claim to fame. Address: No.1 Wenjin Street (Inside Beijing Park), Xicheng District Business hours: Daily 11 am – 1.30 pm, 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm Tel: 6401 1889 Dazhaimen Dazhaimen gives its customers the royal treatment in elaborate wooden chairs. The menu offers “palace cuisine” and four other flavors: tongue numbing Sichuan spice, the sweeter flavors of Guangdong and Hong Kong, Beijing snacks including bitter douzhi (a type of soup made from fermented soybeans), and bone marrow soup sucked right out of the bone. The average dish runs RMB 25 and up, while imperial diners can sample the more extravagant turtle soup and roast duck. The main dining room also features a variety show on the main stage with performances of Peking opera, dulcimer (guqin) and acrobats, and private chambers come elegantly furnished with high-backed chairs and blue-and-white dishware Address:Guoxing Jiayuan, 20A Shouti Nanlu, Haidian District Business hours: Daily 11am-2.30pm, 5-10pm Tel: 8835 6687
The Legend of Kung Fu
Venue: Red Theater 红剧场 Add: Workers' Cultural Palace, 44 Xingfu Dajie, Chongwen District Show time: 19:30-20:30 daily Ticket price: RMB 180-680
Peking Opera at Liyuan Theater
Venue: Liyuan Theater 梨园剧场 Address: 1/F Qianmen Hotel, 175 Yongan Road, Hufangqiao Show time: 19:30-20:50 daily Ticket Price: RMB 180-680
Folk Art Performances
Venue: Laoshe Teahouse 老舍茶馆 Add: 3 Qianmen Xidajie, Tian'anmen前门西大街3号 Show time 19:50-21:20 daily Price: RMB 180-380; some 310 seats.
Acrobatics show at Tiandi Theater
Venue: Tiandi Theater 天地剧场 Add: No.10 Dongzhimen Nanjie Show time: 17:30-18:40 and 19:30 -20:40 daily Price: RMB 180, 280, 380, 480
Acrobatics show at Chaoyang Theater
Venue: Chaoyang Theater 朝阳剧场 Add: 36, Dongsanhuan Beilu, Chaoyang District Show time: 17:15-18:25 and 19:15-20:25 daily Ticket price: RMB 180-680

 

Beijing Tour Itinerary
For booking information, terms and conditions, please contact us: tour@eduabroadchina.com 
A. Great Wall & the Forbidden City One day Tour
Discover the major sites of Beijing: Great Wall, the Forbidden City
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$78/per person
 
B. Great Wall and the Ming Tombs One dayTour
Discover the two World Heritages: Great Wall and the Underground Palace of Ming Tomb
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$110/per person
 
C. The Tian'anmen Square, Forbidden City & Temple of Heaven Tour One day Tour
Discover the major sites of Beijing: Tian’anmen Square, Forbidden City and Temple of Heaven
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$89/per person
 
D. The Lama Temple, the Summer Palace & Panda Garden One day Tour
Highlights: Summer Palace, Lama Temple and Giant Panda
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$90/per person
 
E. The Forbidden City, Tian'anmen Square & the Summer Palace One day Tour
Highlights: Summer Palace, Forbidden City & Tian’anmen Square
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$95/per person
 
F. Hutong tour with Pedicab, Prince Gong’s Mansion, Lama Temple & the Temple of Confucius One day Tour
Highlights: Hutong, Imperial Garden, Lama Temple, Confucius Temple
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$96/per person
 
G. Beijing Religion Tour (1)
Highlights: Lama Temple, White Cloud Taoist Temple & Confucius Temple
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$86/per person
 
H. Beijing Religion Tour (2)
Highlights: Lama Temple, White Cloud Taoist Temple & Catholic Church
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$85/per person
 
I. Hutong tour with Pedicab, Liulichang Old Culture Street & the Summer Palace One Day Tour
Highlights: Hutong by pedicab, Cultural Street, Summer Palace
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 8 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$89/per person
 
J. One Day Great Wall Hiking
Highlights: Jinshanling Section of Great Wall
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 10 hours
Hiking time:4-5 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$145/per person
 
K. Archaeology Tour
Highlights: Peking Man Site at Zhoukoudian
Pick up from and return to your hotel in Beijing
Enjoy a private tour
Duration: 10 hours
Hiking time:4-5 hours
Availability: Daily
Price: From US$145/per person
 
 
Price listed above includes
- Pick-up and drop off at the hotel in Beijing
- Private ground transport in an air conditioned sedan or van
- Entrance fee to the attractions listed in the itinerary
- English-speaking tour guide service
Price excludes
- Meals and drinks
- Personal expenses
- Tips and gratuities
Beijing Subway Map

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